Extravert and Introvert
The Myers & Briggs Foundation

"It is up to each person to recognize his or her true preferences."
Isabel Briggs Myers

C. G. Jung applied the words extravert and introvert in a different manner than they are most often used in today's world. As they are popularly used, the term extraverted is understood to mean sociable or outgoing, while the term introverted is understood to mean shy or withdrawn. Jung, however, originally intended the words to have an entirely different meaning. He used the words to describe the preferred focus of one's energy on either the outer or the inner world. Extraverts orient their energy to the outer world, while Introverts orient their energy to the inner world. One of Jung's and Isabel Myers' great contributions to the field of psychology is their observations that Introversion and Extraversion are both healthy variations in personality style.


Adapted from Building People, Building Programs by Gordon Lawrence and Charles Martin (CAPT 2001)

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